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Exercises to Burn 500 Calories

Every activity that you perform requires energy. This energy is provided when your body breaks down nutrients and releases adenosine triphosphate -- or ATP -- in a calorie-burning reaction. These reactions occur throughout the day to fuel the basic functions of your body as well as to provide energy for movement. Essentially every exercise you perform can burn 500 or more calories, but how quickly you burn those calories is based on the intensity of the exercise and the work your body must perform. For instance, a heavier person burns more calories than a lighter person because it takes more work to move a heavier body.

It would take a 150-lb. individual 41 minutes to burn 502 calories kickboxing according to the "Fitness" magazine calories-burned calculator. A 120-lb. and a 200-lb. individual would have to kickbox for 55 minutes and 33 minutes, respectively, to burn 505 calories. These amounts will vary slightly based on body composition, age and sex, but most people can assume that a 45- to 60-minute kickboxing class will enable them to burn 500 or more calories.

Jogging and running require hard work and burn a significant number of calories over the course of an hour. According to Harvard Health, a 155-lb. person jogging at a 5-mph pace will burn 596 calories during an hour-long workout. That same person could burn 930 calories by increasing his pace to a quick 7.5 mph. A heavier person could expect to burn more calories, as could a person running up hills, which would increase the difficulty of the exercise.

If you like your winter sports, a 155-lb. individual who hits the ice-skating rink could burn 520 calories in 60 minutes. Surprisingly, sledding burns the same number of calories in the same length of time. That same 155-lb. person could increase her winter-sport calorie burn by snowshoeing or cross-country skiing -- 60 minutes burns 596 calories.

Jumping rope also helps you blast calories fast. A 150-lb. individual could burn more than 500 calories in only 44 minutes of jumping. A 120-lb. or 200-lb. person would have to jump 55 or 33 minutes, respectively. Keep in mind that jumping rope can be hard on the joints, so work your way up to a longer routine.

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This article reflects the views of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the views of Jillian Michaels or JillianMichaels.com.